Sustainability

Our Sustainability Journey

McDonald’s Canada’s journey toward sustainable sourcing begins with our direct suppliers and extends to a complex network of indirect suppliers that source ingredients for our menu items. We recognize that the impacts of a large, global supply chain like ours are significant.

trees in a row
trees in a row
young girl with a mcdonald's breakfast sandwich smiling
young girl with a mcdonald's breakfast sandwich smiling
freshly harvested potatoes stacked in the grass
freshly harvested potatoes stacked in the grass

Reducing Our Impact

McDonald’s aspiration is to source all of our food and packaging sustainably.

Environmental Impact

The majority of environmental impacts to air, land and water occur in the McDonald’s supply chain. That’s why we work directly with our suppliers who are committed to doing business responsibly in their own supply chains and making sure that they meet our requirements for ethics, environmental responsibility and economic viability – what we call the Three Es.

Deforestation-Free Packaging

Wood fibre is used in the creation of our consumer packaging, from sandwich wraps and fry boxes to takeout bags and tray liners. One of our 2020 sustainable sourcing goals is to source 100% of our fibre-based packaging from recycled or certified responsibly managed forests where no deforestation occurs. 

McDonald’s uses an internal global scorecard tool called the Eco- Filter to help inform our packaging decisions. McDonald’s works with suppliers to ensure that wood fibre used in our supply chain originates from legal and acceptable sources. We will not knowingly purchase from suppliers that source otherwise.

Less Plastic for McCafé® Cups

McDonald’s worked with packaging supplier HAVI Global Solutions to transition to Clarified Polypropylene (CPP) for McCafé® beverage cups, delivering environmental benefits while maintaining performance. The CPP package uses 20% less material compared to polyethylene terephthalate (PET).

Reducing Pesticide Use by Potato Growers

Working with the Integrated Pest Management Institute, the National Potato Council, and growers in the U.S. and Canada, McDonald’s helped develop a comprehensive audit process that analyzes the use of pesticides, as well as fertilizer and water, on crops.

mcdonald's angus burger
mcdonald's angus burger
hay bales stacked in a field
hay bales stacked in a field
several brown cows in a field
several brown cows in a field

Beef

Burgers are an integral part of our menu, but that’s just one of the reasons we’re on a journey to advance more sustainable beef production. We’re striving to improve environmental practices in how beef is produced, make a positive difference in the livelihoods of farmers, and drive improvements in animal health and welfare.

By joining forces with our partners, our goal is to influence industry-wide changes on a global scale. In 2016, McDonald’s Canada concluded our first beef sustainability pilot project and the industry’s first program to meet the principles and criteria established by the Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef. It was a locally relevant, outcome-based initiative that touched all parts of the supply chain, including ranchers, feedlot operators and packers. As a result, McDonald’s purchased a portion of its beef from a fully verified sustainable supply chain.

Just another of the many ways we continue to make the delicious, craveable food we've always been known for. 

*At least 30% of McDonald's® Angus beef is from certified sustainable sources, according to the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable beef standards. 

coffee beans
coffee beans
a fresh branch of coffee fruit
a fresh branch of coffee fruit

Responsibly Grown Coffee

McDonald’s is making meaningful impacts in our coffee supply chain. We’ve partnered with other industry leaders in a shared effort to make coffee the world’s first sustainable agricultural product by joining Conservation International’s Sustainable Coffee Challenge. In addition, 100% of the espresso beans used in the McCafé beverages we serve in our restaurants are sustainably sourced from Rainforest Alliance Certified™ farms. we’ve launched the McCafé® Sustainability Improvement Platform (SIP), which will help us engage our entire coffee value chain in sustainable sourcing.

fisherman displaying a caught fish to the camera
fisherman displaying a caught fish to the camera
sea boat sailing towards camera
sea boat sailing towards camera
ropes, slings, and buoys on a boat
ropes, slings, and buoys on a boat

Sustainable Fisheries

We serve wild-caught Alaskan Pollock which has been sourced from a fishery and certified sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council. In 2009 McDonald’s was recognized as a seafood champion by Seafood Choices Alliance, for our dedication and leadership within the global sustainable seafood movement, and our work in advancing the marketplace for sustainable seafood.

We're on a journey for a more sustainable future.

What is sustainable beef? At McDonald’s Canada, it’s a commitment. A commitment to ensuring we preserve Canada’s most valuable resources for future generations to come. To look after the land, to care for animals, and to provide the best quality food we possibly can without compromise.

This isn’t the easy road, it’s the right road. As we move forward, side by side with our partners from the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef, Ducks Unlimited Canada, WWF, Nature Conservancy of Canada, academia, government, food and agricultural business and Canadian ranchers and farmers, we are all changing the industry for the better one step at a time. Which is something we are proud of, our partners are proud of, and all Canadians can be proud of too.

Sincerely,

 

john betts signature
john betts signature

John E. Betts
President & CEO
McDonald’s Canada